A Bridge Too Far
PUMA from the air
Dancing Shadows
They bite
Carving it up
Breaking Bad
Pacific Beach
Sunset Cliffs
Bubble Boy
Hunt for Green October
Back in the Day
Fishing Dhows
Sunset over the Cape
Rounding the Cape of Good Hope
Seal Land
Cart Wheel
Surfing from above
Wrecked
Surfing USA
Look out here I come
32 knots of Speed in 10 knots of Wind
Flapping in the Wind.
Bow Blast
Blue Chill
Americas Cup Mono Hulls
Birds Eye Mark
NEED FOR SPEED
RAW Power
Oh No
Just add water
Flying through the spray
The need for speed
Reflection Buoy
Sailing Dhows
Stormy Fishing Boat
Planks
Birds Eye Sailing
Father and Son
Lisboa Roof Tops
Dead Wood
CAMPER power through
Freezing Cold
B52s
Sail in to the Sunset
Letter Boxes
Plow through the wave
Golden PUMA off to Cape Town
Glossy Ocean
Abu Dhabi in Black and White
Lonely PUMA in the Ocean
Old boys play
Miami Yellow cab
Old Bus
Model Boats
Dolphins Play in Newport, RI
Fancy a Doughnut ?
Savannah Enchanted road
Savannah hanging moss
Texas Swing bus
Burn To Shine
Abandon Tybee
Cornish Graveyard
Abu Dhabi wet lands
Shadows on the Beach
Pyrenees Butcher
Big ears
Prayer Time in the city
Jamon o,clock
Balconies Of Barcelona
Barcelona
In the news Today
Seasons change
Chicken Out
Waiting in Lisboa
Valley Of Cold
Slow down
Tintype Truck
Un Wanted
Cold Steel
Urban Art
Gold, Lots of Gold
Fire Hydrant
Bull Fight
River Boats
Moored Boats
Working man on the river
Wrecked On On The River Hamble
Gator Wait
The African Queen
Cape Baboons
Flocking Pink
Little people
Cape Wild Life
Sea Ostrich
My office View
Night Flight in Lisbon
Thunder in the Everglades

A Bridge Too Far

Lisbon Portuguese: Lisboa, is the capital city and largest city of Portugal with a population of 547,631 within its administrative limits[2] on a land area of 84.8 km2 (33 sq mi). The urban area of Lisbon extends beyond the administrative city limits with a population of over 3 million[3] on an area of 958 km2 (370 sq mi),[3] making it the 9th most populous urban area in the European Union. About 2,831,000[4][5] people live in the Lisbon Metropolitan Area (which represents approximately 27% of the population of the country). Lisbon is the westernmost large city located in Europe, as well as its westernmost capital city and the only one along the Atlantic coast. It lies in the western Iberian Peninsula on the Atlantic Ocean and the Tagus River. Lisbon is recognised as a global city because of its importance in finance, commerce, media, entertainment, arts, international trade, education, and tourism.[6][7] It is one of the major economic centres on the continent, with a growing financial sector and the largest/second largest container port on Europe's Atlantic coast.[8] Lisbon Portela Airport serves about 13 million passengers per year; the motorway network and the high-speed rail system of (Alfa Pendular) link the main cities of Portugal.[9] Lisbon is the 23rd most livable city in the World according to lifestyle magazine Monocle.[10] The city is the seventh-most-visited city in Southern Europe, after Istanbul, Rome, Barcelona, Madrid, Athens, and Milan, with 1,740,000 tourists in 2009.[11] The Lisbon region is the wealthiest region in Portugal, GDP PPP per capita is 26,100 euros (4.7% higher than the average European Union's GDP PPP per capita). It is the tenth richest metropolitan area by GDP on the continent amounting to 110 billion euros and thus €39,375 per capita, [12] 40% higher than the average European Union's GDP per capita. The city occupies 32nd place of highest gross earnings in the world.[13] Most of the headquarters of multinationals in the country are located in the Lisbon area and it is the ninth city in the world in terms of quantity of international conferences.[14] It is also the political centre of the country, as seat of Government and residence of the Head of State. The seat of the district of Lisbon and the centre of the Lisbon region. Lisbon is one of the oldest cities in the world, and the oldest city in Western Europe, predating other modern European capitals such as London, Paris and Rome by hundreds of years. Julius Caesar made it a municipium called Felicitas Julia, adding to the name Olissipo. Ruled by a series of Germanic tribes from the fifth century, it was captured by the Moors in the eighth century. In 1147, the Crusaders under Afonso Henriques reconquered the city and since then it has been a major political, economic, and cultural centre of Portugal. Unlike most capital cities, Lisbon's status as the capital of Portugal has never been granted or confirmed officially – by statute or in written form. Its position as the capital has formed through constitutional convention, making its position as de facto capital a part of the Constitution of Portugal. Lisbon hosts two agencies of the European Union: the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA) and the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA). Called the "Capital of the Lusophone world", the Community of Portuguese Language Countries has its headquarters in the city, in the Palace of the Counts of Penafiel. Lisbon has two sites listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site: Belém Tower and Jerónimos Monastery. Furthermore, in 1994, Lisbon was the European Capital of Culture and in 1998 organised an Expo '98 (1998 Lisbon World Exposition). Lisbon enjoys a Mediterranean climate. Among all the metropolises in Europe, it has the warmest winters, with average temperatures 15 °C (59 °F) during the day and 8 °C (46 °F) at night from December to February. The typical summer's season lasts about six months, from May to October, although also in November, March and April temperatures sometimes reach around 20 °C (68.0 °F) ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

PUMA from the air

The fleet of Volvo Open 70's at the start of leg 1 of the Volvo Ocean race 2011-12 from Alicante, Spain to Cape Town, South Africa. (Photo Credit Must Read: PAUL TODD/VOLVO OCEAN RACE

Dancing Shadows

Working on the bow at an Americas cup, Louis Vuitton regatta in La Maddalena, Sardinia, Italy. ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

They bite

A day with Marine Dynamics Tours to learn about great white shark conservation in their habitat 2 1/2 hour drive East of Cape Town in Gansbaai and Dyer Island. Cape Town, South Africa. (Photo Credit Must Read: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Carving it up

Big surf rolls in to Sunset Cliffs in mid February with blue sky and glassy conditions. San Diego is the eighth-largest city in the United States and second-largest city in California. The city is located on the coast of the Pacific Ocean in Southern California, immediately adjacent to the Mexican border. The birthplace of California, San Diego is known for its mild year-round climate, natural deep-water harbour, extensive beaches, long association with the U.S. Navy, and recent emergence as a healthcare and biotechnology development centre. The population was 1,322,553 based on latest population estimates for 2012 Historically home to the Kumeyaay people, San Diego was the first site visited by Europeans on what is now the West Coast of the United States. Upon landing in San Diego Bay in 1542, Juan Cabrillo claimed the entire area for Spain, forming the basis for the settlement of Alta California 200 years later. The Presidio and Mission of San Diego, founded in 1769, were the first European settlement in what is now California. In 1821, San Diego became part of newly independent Mexico, and in 1850, became part of the United States following the Mexican-American War and the admission of California to the union.The city is the county seat of San Diego County and is the economic centre of the San Diego–Carlsbad–San Marcos metropolitan area as well as the San Diego–Tijuana metropolitan area. San Diego's main economic engines are military and defence-related activities, tourism, international trade, and manufacturing. The presence of the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), with the affiliated UCSD Medical Center, has helped make the area a centre of research in biotechnology. ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Breaking Bad

Big surf rolls in to Sunset Cliffs in mid February with blue sky and glassy conditions. San Diego is the eighth-largest city in the United States and second-largest city in California. The city is located on the coast of the Pacific Ocean in Southern California, immediately adjacent to the Mexican border. The birthplace of California, San Diego is known for its mild year-round climate, natural deep-water harbour, extensive beaches, long association with the U.S. Navy, and recent emergence as a healthcare and biotechnology development centre. The population was 1,322,553 based on latest population estimates for 2012 Historically home to the Kumeyaay people, San Diego was the first site visited by Europeans on what is now the West Coast of the United States. Upon landing in San Diego Bay in 1542, Juan Cabrillo claimed the entire area for Spain, forming the basis for the settlement of Alta California 200 years later. The Presidio and Mission of San Diego, founded in 1769, were the first European settlement in what is now California. In 1821, San Diego became part of newly independent Mexico, and in 1850, became part of the United States following the Mexican-American War and the admission of California to the union.The city is the county seat of San Diego County and is the economic centre of the San Diego–Carlsbad–San Marcos metropolitan area as well as the San Diego–Tijuana metropolitan area. San Diego's main economic engines are military and defence-related activities, tourism, international trade, and manufacturing. The presence of the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), with the affiliated UCSD Medical Center, has helped make the area a centre of research in biotechnology. ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Pacific Beach

Big surf rolls in to Sunset Cliffs in mid February with blue sky and glassy conditions. San Diego is the eighth-largest city in the United States and second-largest city in California. The city is located on the coast of the Pacific Ocean in Southern California, immediately adjacent to the Mexican border. The birthplace of California, San Diego is known for its mild year-round climate, natural deep-water harbour, extensive beaches, long association with the U.S. Navy, and recent emergence as a healthcare and biotechnology development centre. The population was 1,322,553 based on latest population estimates for 2012 Historically home to the Kumeyaay people, San Diego was the first site visited by Europeans on what is now the West Coast of the United States. Upon landing in San Diego Bay in 1542, Juan Cabrillo claimed the entire area for Spain, forming the basis for the settlement of Alta California 200 years later. The Presidio and Mission of San Diego, founded in 1769, were the first European settlement in what is now California. In 1821, San Diego became part of newly independent Mexico, and in 1850, became part of the United States following the Mexican-American War and the admission of California to the union.The city is the county seat of San Diego County and is the economic centre of the San Diego–Carlsbad–San Marcos metropolitan area as well as the San Diego–Tijuana metropolitan area. San Diego's main economic engines are military and defence-related activities, tourism, international trade, and manufacturing. The presence of the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), with the affiliated UCSD Medical Center, has helped make the area a centre of research in biotechnology. ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Sunset Cliffs

Big surf rolls in to Sunset Cliffs in mid February with blue sky and glassy conditions. San Diego is the eighth-largest city in the United States and second-largest city in California. The city is located on the coast of the Pacific Ocean in Southern California, immediately adjacent to the Mexican border. The birthplace of California, San Diego is known for its mild year-round climate, natural deep-water harbour, extensive beaches, long association with the U.S. Navy, and recent emergence as a healthcare and biotechnology development centre. The population was 1,322,553 based on latest population estimates for 2012 Historically home to the Kumeyaay people, San Diego was the first site visited by Europeans on what is now the West Coast of the United States. Upon landing in San Diego Bay in 1542, Juan Cabrillo claimed the entire area for Spain, forming the basis for the settlement of Alta California 200 years later. The Presidio and Mission of San Diego, founded in 1769, were the first European settlement in what is now California. In 1821, San Diego became part of newly independent Mexico, and in 1850, became part of the United States following the Mexican-American War and the admission of California to the union.The city is the county seat of San Diego County and is the economic centre of the San Diego–Carlsbad–San Marcos metropolitan area as well as the San Diego–Tijuana metropolitan area. San Diego's main economic engines are military and defence-related activities, tourism, international trade, and manufacturing. The presence of the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), with the affiliated UCSD Medical Center, has helped make the area a centre of research in biotechnology. ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Bubble Boy

The boy exhales as he gets near the surface of the deep pool. Using the carbon housing in our salt water swimming pool.©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Hunt for Green October

Race leaders (FRA) Groupama Sailing Team, skippered by Franck Cammas from France, finish first on leg 8, from Lisbon, Portugal, to Lorient, France, during the Volvo Ocean Race 2011-12. We had rigged the AS350 chopper with a nose mounted FLUR and got the position of the leading race boat from Volvo HQ back in Alicante, Spain. Groupama was maintaining speeds of over 30knts and by the time we got to them at first light we would be more 120nm from the nearest land. We had stripped out the machine to make it as light as possible. We fuelled her up to the max. I had a small life raft under my feet and it was time to take off and go hunting for the race boats in this powerful storm. To make this shot I had to have one foot outside the machine on the skids and being buffered about by wind gusts of over 50knts. Just another day at the office. (Photo Credit: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM)

Back in the Day

The River Hamble is a river in Hampshire, England. It rises near Bishop's Waltham and flows for some 7.5 miles (12 km) through Botley, Bursledon and Swanwick before entering Southampton Water near Hamble-le-Rice and Warsash. The Hamble is tidal for approximately half its length and is navigable in its lower reaches, which have facilitated shipbuilding activities since medieval times. Leisure craft are still built there today. One of these builders was Luke & co, later Luke Bros, a reputed yard at Hamble from around 1890 to 1945. The river, and its shipbuilding yards, have also been used for military purposes, particularly during World War II. Its lower reaches are now very popular for boating, being known throughout the sailing world as The Heart of British Yachting ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Fishing Dhows

The United Arab Emirates, sometimes simply called the Emirates or the UAE, is a country situated in the southeast of the Arabian Peninsula in Western Asia on the Persian Gulf, bordering Oman to the east and Saudi Arabia to the south, as well as sharing sea borders with Qatar to the west and Iran to the north. (Photo Credit Must Read: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Sunset over the Cape

Coastlines of the world and one of the most famous the Cape of Good Hope. There is a misconception that the Cape of Good Hope is the southern tip of Africa, because it was once believed to be the dividing point between the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. In fact, the southernmost point is Cape Agulhas, about 150 kilometres (90 mi) to the east-southeast. The currents of the two oceans meet at the point where the warm-water Agulhas current meets the cold water Benguela current and turns back on itself—a point that fluctuates between Cape Agulhas and Cape Point (about 1.2 kilometres east of the Cape of Good Hope). When following the western side of the African coastline from the equator, however, the Cape of Good Hope marks the point where a ship begins to travel more eastward than southward. Thus, the first modern rounding of the cape in 1488 by Portuguese explorer Bartolomeu Dias was a milestone in the attempts by the Portuguese to establish direct trade relations with the Far East (although in his histories Herodotus proves, disbelievingly, that some Phoenicians had done so far earlier than this[1]). Dias(or Diaz) called the cape Cabo das Tormentas. "Cape of Storms" was the original name of the "Cape of Good Hope".[2] As one of the great capes of the South Atlantic Ocean, the Cape of Good Hope has been of special significance to sailors for many years and is widely referred to by them simply as "the Cape."[3] It is a waypoint on the clipper route followed by clipper ships to the Far East and Australia, and still followed by several offshore yacht races. (Photo Credit Must Read: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Rounding the Cape of Good Hope

Coastlines of the world and one of the most famous the Cape of Good Hope. There is a misconception that the Cape of Good Hope is the southern tip of Africa, because it was once believed to be the dividing point between the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. In fact, the southernmost point is Cape Agulhas, about 150 kilometres (90 mi) to the east-southeast. The currents of the two oceans meet at the point where the warm-water Agulhas current meets the cold water Benguela current and turns back on itself—a point that fluctuates between Cape Agulhas and Cape Point (about 1.2 kilometres east of the Cape of Good Hope). When following the western side of the African coastline from the equator, however, the Cape of Good Hope marks the point where a ship begins to travel more eastward than southward. Thus, the first modern rounding of the cape in 1488 by Portuguese explorer Bartolomeu Dias was a milestone in the attempts by the Portuguese to establish direct trade relations with the Far East (although in his histories Herodotus proves, disbelievingly, that some Phoenicians had done so far earlier than this[1]). Dias(or Diaz) called the cape Cabo das Tormentas. "Cape of Storms" was the original name of the "Cape of Good Hope".[2] As one of the great capes of the South Atlantic Ocean, the Cape of Good Hope has been of special significance to sailors for many years and is widely referred to by them simply as "the Cape."[3] It is a waypoint on the clipper route followed by clipper ships to the Far East and Australia, and still followed by several offshore yacht races. (Photo Credit Must Read: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Seal Land

Spending the day with Marine Dynamics Tours to learn about great white shark conservation in their habitat 2 1/2 hour drive East of Cape Town in Gansbaai and Dyer Island. Cape Town, South Africa. Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Cart Wheel

SAN FRANCISCO, USA – October 06: Oracle Team USA (USA) Skipper and Helmsman James Spithill flips his boat around the first turning mark during Day 4 of the America’s Cup World Series on 06 October, 2012, in San Francisco, USA (Photo by Paul Todd/ OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM Outside Images Photo Agency

Surfing from above

Surfing off the coast in Lisbon, Portugal shooting out of a chopper to get a birds eye view. Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Wrecked

The River Hamble is a river in Hampshire, England. It rises near Bishop's Waltham and flows for some 7.5 miles (12 km) through Botley, Bursledon and Swanwick before entering Southampton Water near Hamble-le-Rice and Warsash. The Hamble is tidal for approximately half its length and is navigable in its lower reaches, which have facilitated shipbuilding activities since medieval times. Leisure craft are still built there today. One of these builders was Luke & co, later Luke Bros, a reputed yard at Hamble from around 1890 to 1945. The river, and its shipbuilding yards, have also been used for military purposes, particularly during World War II. Its lower reaches are now very popular for boating, being known throughout the sailing world as The Heart of British Yachting. Paul Todd/outsideimages.com

Surfing USA

Surfing off Pacific beach in San diego after a huge storm. Photo Credit © Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Look out here I come

30 seconds before the start gun goes there is a wind dog fight between two 80 ft carbon yachts and 34 crew. Photo Credit: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM)

32 knots of Speed in 10 knots of Wind

BMW Oracle Racing testing their new multihull miles off the Californian coast line near San Diego. Photo Credit: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM)

Flapping in the Wind.

A very windy day during the J 80 one design worlds in Newport, Rhode Island 2010. © WWW.OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM Photo Credit must read © PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Bow Blast

Rough day at the office with the bow of Mascalzone Latino pops right out in to the air less than half a mile off the coast of Nice, France during the Louis Vuitton Cup. Photo Credit: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM)

Blue Chill

Chill out time at the Miami, South beach with an awesome line up of blue umbrellas. Photo Credit: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM)

Americas Cup Mono Hulls

Americas Cup, Auckland New Zealand with Oracle BMW coming in to the bottom mark and the foredeck crew getting ready for a spinaker drop. Photo Credit: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM)

Birds Eye Mark

Americas Cup, Auckland New Zealand with Oracle BMW coming in to the bottom mark and the foredeck crew getting ready for a spinaker drop. Photo Credit: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM)

NEED FOR SPEED

Volvo Ocean Race stop over Sanya, China with PUMA Ocean Racing creating a lot of spray off her bow. (Photo Credit Must Read: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

RAW Power

Surfing big waves in 50 knots of wind at "the Dunes" Noordhoek,Cape Town, South Africa. (Photo Credit: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM)

Oh No

SAN FRANCISCO, USA – October 06: Oracle Team USA (USA) Skipper and Helmsman James Spithill flips his boat around the first turning mark during Day 4 of the America’s Cup World Series on 06 October, 2012, in San Francisco, USA (Photo by Paul Todd /OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM)

Just add water

Race leaders (FRA) Groupama Sailing Team, skippered by Franck Cammas from France, finish first on leg 8, from Lisbon, Portugal, to Lorient, France, during the Volvo Ocean Race 2011-12. We had rigged the AS350 chopper with a nose mounted FLUR and got the position of the leading race boat from Volvo HQ back in Alicante, Spain. Groupama was maintaining speeds of over 30knts and by the time we got to them at first light we would be more 120nm from the nearest land. We had stripped out the machine to make it as light as possible. We fuelled her up to the max. I had a small life raft under my feet and it was time to take off and go hunting for the race boats in this powerful storm. To make this shot I had to have one foot outside the machine on the skids and being buffered about by wind gusts of over 50knts. Just another day at the office. (Photo Credit: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM)

Flying through the spray

Kite Surfing big waves in 50 knots of wind at "the Dunes" Noordhoek,Cape Town, South Africa. (Photo Credit: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM)

The need for speed

Surfing big waves in 50 knots of wind at "the Dunes" Noordhoek,Cape Town, South Africa. (Photo Credit: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM)

Reflection Buoy

Stock Marine and Fishing Images. Fishing on the Ogeechee River 2013- Georgia, USA. Ogeechee River is a 294-mile-long (473 km) blackwater river in the U.S. state of Georgia. It heads at the confluence of its North and South Forks, about 2.5 miles (4.0 km) south-southwest of Crawfordville and flowing generally southeast to Ossabaw Sound about 16 miles (26 km) south of Savannah. Its largest tributary is the Canoochee River. The Ogeechee has a watershed of 5,540 square miles (14,300 km2). The Ogeechee runs from the Piedmont across the fall line and sand hill region, then across the coastal plain of Georgia to the ocean. From a shallow clear running stream with several shoals, rapids, and a small falls at Shoals, below Louisville the river becomes a lazy meandering channel through beautiful cypress swamps and miles of undeveloped forests. The origin of the name "Ogeechee" is uncertain, but it may be derived from a Muskogee term meaning "river of the Uchees", referring to the Yuchi people, who inhabited areas near it.The Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto crossed the Ogeechee (between where present-day Sandersville and Louisville developed) on April 22, 1541, during his exploration of the southeast part of North America ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Sailing Dhows

Designed to be printed in large format for your home, office or interior design. All can be purchased online simply with your credit card and delivered to your door step. New images added every week. Wall Art images is a collection of pictures by outside Images photographers world wide while on their travels to exotic locations.

Stormy Fishing Boat

Fishing boat in heavy weather. El Campello beach With a coast line of 23 km, El Campello offers a varied and attractive coast. At its extreme north there are cliffs and secluded coves with translucent waters. Next to the port and in the old fishermans area, the Carrerlamar beach, regenerated with fine golden sand, runs parallel to the pedestrian promenade. This promenade, together with the port walk, form the leisure and entertainment centre. Finally the Muchavista beach extends to the south along more than 3 km before merging into San Juan beach. The defence and preservation of our coasts has received the blue flag recognition, and the seal of environmental Quality ISO 14.001, for the quality of its waters, the upkeep and cleanliness of its surroundings and for its services and facilities. Photo Credit must read ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Planks

The River Hamble is a river in Hampshire, England. It rises near Bishop's Waltham and flows for some 7.5 miles (12 km) through Botley, Bursledon and Swanwick before entering Southampton Water near Hamble-le-Rice and Warsash. The Hamble is tidal for approximately half its length and is navigable in its lower reaches, which have facilitated shipbuilding activities since medieval times. Leisure craft are still built there today. One of these builders was Luke & co, later Luke Bros, a reputed yard at Hamble from around 1890 to 1945. The river, and its shipbuilding yards, have also been used for military purposes, particularly during World War II. Its lower reaches are now very popular for boating, being known throughout the sailing world as The Heart of British Yachting ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Birds Eye Sailing

A traditional Dhow regatta held 12 miles off the coast of Abu Dhabi. The United Arab Emirates, sometimes simply called the Emirates or the UAE, is a country situated in the southeast of the Arabian Peninsula in Western Asia on the Persian Gulf, bordering Oman to the east and Saudi Arabia to the south, as well as sharing sea borders with Qatar to the west and Iran to the north. (Photo Credit Must Read: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Father and Son

Barcelona is the capital of Catalonia and the second largest city in Spain, after Madrid, with a population of 1,621,537 within its administrative limits on a land area of 101.4 km2 (39 sq mi). The urban area of Barcelona extends beyond the administrative city limits with a population of between 4,200,000[1] and 4,500,000[2] within an area of 803 km2 (310 sq mi),[1] being the sixth-most populous urban area in the European Union after Paris, London, the Ruhr, Madrid and Milan. About five million[3][4][5][6] people live in the Barcelona metropolitan area. It is also the largest metropolis on the Mediterranean Sea. It is located on the Mediterranean coast between the mouths of the rivers Llobregat and Besòs and is bounded to the west by the Serra de Collserola ridge (512 m/1,680 ft). Founded as a Roman city, Barcelona became the capital of the County of Barcelona. After merging with the Kingdom of Aragon, Barcelona became one of the most important cities of the Crown of Aragon. Besieged several times during its history, Barcelona has a rich cultural heritage and is today an important cultural centre and a major tourist destination. Particularly renowned are the architectural works of Antoni Gaudí and Lluís Domènech i Montaner, which have been designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites. The headquarters of the Union for the Mediterranean is located in Barcelona. The city is known for hosting the 1992 Summer Olympics as well as world-class conferences and expositions and also many international sport tournaments. Barcelona is today one of the world's leading tourist, economic, trade fair/exhibitions and cultural-sports centres, and its influence in commerce, education, entertainment, media, fashion, science, and the arts all contribute to its status as one of the world's major global cities.[7][8] Indeed, it is a major cultural and economic centre in southwestern Europe (Iberian Peninsula), 26th in the world (after Moscow, before Dubai)[9] and a growing financial centre (Diagonal Mar and Gran Via). It is the fourth economically powerful city by GDP in the European Union and 35th in the world with an output amounting to €177 billion.[10] As of 2009 the city was ranked Europe's third and one of the world's most successful as a city brand.[11] At the same time, the city was ranked Europe's fourth best city for business and fastest improving European city, with growth improved by 17% per year.[12] Barcelona is the transport hub with one of Europe's principal ports, Barcelona international airport, which handles above 34 million passengers per year, extensive motorway network and also is a hub of high-speed rail, particularly that which is intended to link Spain with France and the rest of Europe as the second longest in the world ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Lisboa Roof Tops

Lisbon Portuguese: Lisboa, is the capital city and largest city of Portugal with a population of 547,631 within its administrative limits[2] on a land area of 84.8 km2 (33 sq mi). The urban area of Lisbon extends beyond the administrative city limits with a population of over 3 million[3] on an area of 958 km2 (370 sq mi),[3] making it the 9th most populous urban area in the European Union. About 2,831,000[4][5] people live in the Lisbon Metropolitan Area (which represents approximately 27% of the population of the country). Lisbon is the westernmost large city located in Europe, as well as its westernmost capital city and the only one along the Atlantic coast. It lies in the western Iberian Peninsula on the Atlantic Ocean and the Tagus River. Lisbon is recognised as a global city because of its importance in finance, commerce, media, entertainment, arts, international trade, education, and tourism.[6][7] It is one of the major economic centres on the continent, with a growing financial sector and the largest/second largest container port on Europe's Atlantic coast.[8] Lisbon Portela Airport serves about 13 million passengers per year; the motorway network and the high-speed rail system of (Alfa Pendular) link the main cities of Portugal.[9] Lisbon is the 23rd most livable city in the World according to lifestyle magazine Monocle.[10] The city is the seventh-most-visited city in Southern Europe, after Istanbul, Rome, Barcelona, Madrid, Athens, and Milan, with 1,740,000 tourists in 2009.[11] The Lisbon region is the wealthiest region in Portugal, GDP PPP per capita is 26,100 euros (4.7% higher than the average European Union's GDP PPP per capita). It is the tenth richest metropolitan area by GDP on the continent amounting to 110 billion euros and thus €39,375 per capita, [12] 40% higher than the average European Union's GDP per capita. The city occupies 32nd place of highest gross earnings in the world.[13] Most of the headquarters of multinationals in the country are located in the Lisbon area and it is the ninth city in the world in terms of quantity of international conferences.[14] It is also the political centre of the country, as seat of Government and residence of the Head of State. The seat of the district of Lisbon and the centre of the Lisbon region. Lisbon is one of the oldest cities in the world, and the oldest city in Western Europe, predating other modern European capitals such as London, Paris and Rome by hundreds of years. Julius Caesar made it a municipium called Felicitas Julia, adding to the name Olissipo. Ruled by a series of Germanic tribes from the fifth century, it was captured by the Moors in the eighth century. In 1147, the Crusaders under Afonso Henriques reconquered the city and since then it has been a major political, economic, and cultural centre of Portugal. Unlike most capital cities, Lisbon's status as the capital of Portugal has never been granted or confirmed officially – by statute or in written form. Its position as the capital has formed through constitutional convention, making its position as de facto capital a part of the Constitution of Portugal. Lisbon hosts two agencies of the European Union: the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA) and the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA). Called the "Capital of the Lusophone world", the Community of Portuguese Language Countries has its headquarters in the city, in the Palace of the Counts of Penafiel. Lisbon has two sites listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site: Belém Tower and Jerónimos Monastery. Furthermore, in 1994, Lisbon was the European Capital of Culture and in 1998 organised an Expo '98 (1998 Lisbon World Exposition). Lisbon enjoys a Mediterranean climate. Among all the metropolises in Europe, it has the warmest winters, with average temperatures 15 °C (59 °F) during the day and 8 °C (46 °F) at night from December to February. The typical summer's season lasts about six months, from May to October, although also in November, March and April temperatures sometimes reach around 20 °C (68.0 °F) ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Dead Wood

Heavy snow fall in the small town of Julian, San Diego, California, Saturday the 9th of February 2013. Julian is an historic gold mining town located approximately an hour east of San Diego. It is the premier mountain retreat in the county and is unique in that it has four seasons. Spring brings the blossoming of many flowers including daffodils, summer is perfect for hiking and star gazing, fall is famous for our apples and fall colors, and winter brings snowfalls and bright, crisp, "Christmassy" days. Although famous for apples and our superb apple pie one can enjoy all year round, Julian has become the center for visitors who wish to stay in the mountains but take day trips to the nearby casinos, the Anza Borrego Desert State Park and the coast. It has always been the B&B capital of Southern California, known for its romantic atmosphere, but is now fast becoming a great destination for families, hikers, weddings and corporate retreats. Specialty shops line our streets, our attractions are unique, ranging from wineries to wolves. From the old time melodrama to the Grape Stomp Fiesta, Julian events are great for couples, families and groups. The hallmark of Julian is apple pie. After the American Civil War, Julian experienced a gold rush. In 1869, A.E. "Fred" Coleman, a former slave, was crossing over what is now known as Coleman Creek, just west of Julian. Seeing a glint of gold in the stream bed, he climbed down from his horse to investigate. Having had previous experience in the gold fields, he retrieved his frying pan and began panning the sands of the creek. Learning of the find, others tried to trace the gold to its source. On February 22, 1870, the first "lode", or hard rock, mining claim was filed in the Julian area. ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

CAMPER power through

The fleet of Volvo Open 70's at the start of leg 1 of the Volvo Ocean race 2011-12 from Alicante, Spain to Cape Town, South Africa. (Photo Credit Must Read: PAUL TODD/VOLVO OCEAN RACE

Freezing Cold

Ice and snow on the plants up in Julian looking down on to the Anza-Borrego Desert State Park. Heavy snow fall in the small town of Julian, San Diego, California, Saturday the 9th of February 2013. ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

B52s

B52s playing at Austin City Limits in Texas. They can still belt out a tune. © Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Sail in to the Sunset

The fleet of Volvo Open 70's at the start of leg 1 of the Volvo Ocean race 2011-12 from Alicante, Spain to Cape Town, South Africa. (Photo Credit Must Read: PAUL TODD/VOLVO OCEAN RACE

Letter Boxes

Heavy snow fall in the small town of Julian, San Diego, California, Saturday the 9th of February 2013. Julian is an historic gold mining town located approximately an hour east of San Diego. It is the premier mountain retreat in the county and is unique in that it has four seasons. Spring brings the blossoming of many flowers including daffodils, summer is perfect for hiking and star gazing, fall is famous for our apples and fall colors, and winter brings snowfalls and bright, crisp, "Christmassy" days. Although famous for apples and our superb apple pie one can enjoy all year round, Julian has become the center for visitors who wish to stay in the mountains but take day trips to the nearby casinos, the Anza Borrego Desert State Park and the coast. It has always been the B&B capital of Southern California, known for its romantic atmosphere, but is now fast becoming a great destination for families, hikers, weddings and corporate retreats. Specialty shops line our streets, our attractions are unique, ranging from wineries to wolves. From the old time melodrama to the Grape Stomp Fiesta, Julian events are great for couples, families and groups. The hallmark of Julian is apple pie. After the American Civil War, Julian experienced a gold rush. In 1869, A.E. "Fred" Coleman, a former slave, was crossing over what is now known as Coleman Creek, just west of Julian. Seeing a glint of gold in the stream bed, he climbed down from his horse to investigate. Having had previous experience in the gold fields, he retrieved his frying pan and began panning the sands of the creek. Learning of the find, others tried to trace the gold to its source. On February 22, 1870, the first "lode", or hard rock, mining claim was filed in the Julian area. ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Plow through the wave

The fleet of Volvo Open 70's at the start of leg 1 of the Volvo Ocean race 2011-12 from Alicante, Spain to Cape Town, South Africa. (Photo Credit Must Read: PAUL TODD/VOLVO OCEAN RACE

Golden PUMA off to Cape Town

The fleet of Volvo Open 70's at the start of leg 1 of the Volvo Ocean race 2011-12 from Alicante, Spain to Cape Town, South Africa. (Photo Credit Must Read: PAUL TODD/VOLVO OCEAN RACE

Glossy Ocean

Lisbon start to Lorient, France of the Volvo Ocean Race 2011-12. (Photo Credit: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Abu Dhabi in Black and White

The fleet of Volvo Open 70's at the start of leg 1 of the Volvo Ocean race 2011-12 from Alicante, Spain to Cape Town, South Africa. (Photo Credit Must Read: PAUL TODD/VOLVO OCEAN RACE

Lonely PUMA in the Ocean

The fleet of Volvo Open 70's at the start of leg 1 of the Volvo Ocean race 2011-12 from Alicante, Spain to Cape Town, South Africa. (Photo Credit Must Read: PAUL TODD/VOLVO OCEAN RACE

Old boys play

ElCampello Marina. El Campello has a proud history giving the town a unique feel. Around the port area archaeological remains of circular cabins dating back to 3000BC have been found and the little fishing harbour with its adjoining mariner are overlooked by a 16th century watchtower that acted as a warning against raids from Berber Pirates. Photo Credit must read © WWW.OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Miami Yellow cab

Miami yellow cab rushes by on the way to South beach. Photo Credit must read WWW.OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Old Bus

An old bus sits in a front yard in Bluffton, South Carolina Photo Credit must read © WWW.OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Model Boats

A small fishing village in Devon there is a fisherman's cottage with these lovely hand made wooden models in the window. © WWW.OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Dolphins Play in Newport, RI

Dolphins play just in front of a fleet of sail boats in Newport Harbor. Photo Credit must read © PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Fancy a Doughnut ?

Architecture can be in many shapes and forms the has a huge influence on our lifestyle. This is the Krispy Kreme doughnut house in Atlanta taken at 2am on a very cold January morning. Photo Credit must read © WWW.OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Savannah Enchanted road

Enchanted road of Savannah, Georgia in January. ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Savannah hanging moss

Beautiful hanging moss on the trees around the quiet streets of Savannah ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Texas Swing bus

Texas swing bus beside an old dance hall in Austin, Texas. ©Paul Todd/outsideimages.com

Burn To Shine

Ben Harper at Austin City Limits getting some big air on stage. ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Abandon Tybee

Abandon house on Tybee Island in Savannah, Georgia. © Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Cornish Graveyard

A HDR of a small Cornish graveyard on a rough and stormy day. © Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Abu Dhabi wet lands

ABU DHABI Pink Flamingos are breeding in Abu Dhabi's Al Wathba Wetland Reserve for the first time in almost a decade. I took this in the middle of a photo shoot from a chopper at about 100 feet. We had taken the door off the machine. Paul Todd/ OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Shadows on the Beach

Early morning shadows fall on an Abu Dhabi beach just after being groomed for the day by a giant tractor. Abu Dhabi in the UAE. Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Pyrenees Butcher

The Mercat de Sant Josep de la Boqueria, often simply referred to as La Boqueria (Catalan pronunciation: [ɫə βu.kəˈɾi.ə]), is a large public market in the Ciutat Vella district of Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain and one of the city's foremost tourist landmarks, with an entrance from La Rambla, not far from the Liceu, Barcelona's opera house. The market has a very diverse selection of goods. The first mention of the Boqueria market in Barcelona dates from 1217, when tables were installed near the old city gate to sell meat. From December 1470 onwards, a pig market was held at this site; at this time it was known as Mercat Bornet. Later, until 1794, it was known simply as Mercat de la Palla, or straw market. In the beginning, the market was not enclosed and had no official status, being regarded simply as an extension of the Plaça Nova market, which extended to the Plaça del Pi. Later, the authorities decided to construct a separate market on La Rambla, housing mainly fishmongers and butchers. It was not until 1826 that the market was legally recognized, and a convention held in 1835 decided to build an official structure. Construction began on March 19, 1840 under the direction of the architect Mas Vilà. The market officially opened in the same year, but the plans for the building were modified many times. The inauguration of the structure finally took place in 1853. A new fish market opened in 1911, and the metal roof that still exists today was constructed in 1914. ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Big ears

The Mercat de Sant Josep de la Boqueria, often simply referred to as La Boqueria (Catalan pronunciation: [ɫə βu.kəˈɾi.ə]), is a large public market in the Ciutat Vella district of Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain and one of the city's foremost tourist landmarks, with an entrance from La Rambla, not far from the Liceu, Barcelona's opera house. The market has a very diverse selection of goods. The first mention of the Boqueria market in Barcelona dates from 1217, when tables were installed near the old city gate to sell meat. From December 1470 onwards, a pig market was held at this site; at this time it was known as Mercat Bornet. Later, until 1794, it was known simply as Mercat de la Palla, or straw market. In the beginning, the market was not enclosed and had no official status, being regarded simply as an extension of the Plaça Nova market, which extended to the Plaça del Pi. Later, the authorities decided to construct a separate market on La Rambla, housing mainly fishmongers and butchers. It was not until 1826 that the market was legally recognized, and a convention held in 1835 decided to build an official structure. Construction began on March 19, 1840 under the direction of the architect Mas Vilà. The market officially opened in the same year, but the plans for the building were modified many times. The inauguration of the structure finally took place in 1853. A new fish market opened in 1911, and the metal roof that still exists today was constructed in 1914. ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Prayer Time in the city

Barcelona is the capital of Catalonia and the second largest city in Spain, after Madrid, with a population of 1,621,537 within its administrative limits on a land area of 101.4 km2 (39 sq mi). The urban area of Barcelona extends beyond the administrative city limits with a population of between 4,200,000[1] and 4,500,000[2] within an area of 803 km2 (310 sq mi),[1] being the sixth-most populous urban area in the European Union after Paris, London, the Ruhr, Madrid and Milan. About five million[3][4][5][6] people live in the Barcelona metropolitan area. It is also the largest metropolis on the Mediterranean Sea. It is located on the Mediterranean coast between the mouths of the rivers Llobregat and Besòs and is bounded to the west by the Serra de Collserola ridge (512 m/1,680 ft). Founded as a Roman city, Barcelona became the capital of the County of Barcelona. After merging with the Kingdom of Aragon, Barcelona became one of the most important cities of the Crown of Aragon. Besieged several times during its history, Barcelona has a rich cultural heritage and is today an important cultural centre and a major tourist destination. Particularly renowned are the architectural works of Antoni Gaudí and Lluís Domènech i Montaner, which have been designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites. The headquarters of the Union for the Mediterranean is located in Barcelona. The city is known for hosting the 1992 Summer Olympics as well as world-class conferences and expositions and also many international sport tournaments. Barcelona is today one of the world's leading tourist, economic, trade fair/exhibitions and cultural-sports centres, and its influence in commerce, education, entertainment, media, fashion, science, and the arts all contribute to its status as one of the world's major global cities.[7][8] Indeed, it is a major cultural and economic centre in southwestern Europe (Iberian Peninsula), 26th in the world (after Moscow, before Dubai)[9] and a growing financial centre (Diagonal Mar and Gran Via). It is the fourth economically powerful city by GDP in the European Union and 35th in the world with an output amounting to €177 billion.[10] As of 2009 the city was ranked Europe's third and one of the world's most successful as a city brand.[11] At the same time, the city was ranked Europe's fourth best city for business and fastest improving European city, with growth improved by 17% per year.[12] Barcelona is the transport hub with one of Europe's principal ports, Barcelona international airport, which handles above 34 million passengers per year, extensive motorway network and also is a hub of high-speed rail, particularly that which is intended to link Spain with France and the rest of Europe as the second longest in the world ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Jamon o,clock

The Mercat de Sant Josep de la Boqueria, often simply referred to as La Boqueria (Catalan pronunciation: [ɫə βu.kəˈɾi.ə]), is a large public market in the Ciutat Vella district of Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain and one of the city's foremost tourist landmarks, with an entrance from La Rambla, not far from the Liceu, Barcelona's opera house. The market has a very diverse selection of goods. The first mention of the Boqueria market in Barcelona dates from 1217, when tables were installed near the old city gate to sell meat. From December 1470 onwards, a pig market was held at this site; at this time it was known as Mercat Bornet. Later, until 1794, it was known simply as Mercat de la Palla, or straw market. In the beginning, the market was not enclosed and had no official status, being regarded simply as an extension of the Plaça Nova market, which extended to the Plaça del Pi. Later, the authorities decided to construct a separate market on La Rambla, housing mainly fishmongers and butchers. It was not until 1826 that the market was legally recognized, and a convention held in 1835 decided to build an official structure. Construction began on March 19, 1840 under the direction of the architect Mas Vilà. The market officially opened in the same year, but the plans for the building were modified many times. The inauguration of the structure finally took place in 1853. A new fish market opened in 1911, and the metal roof that still exists today was constructed in 1914. ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Balconies Of Barcelona

Barcelona is the capital of Catalonia and the second largest city in Spain, after Madrid, with a population of 1,621,537 within its administrative limits on a land area of 101.4 km2 (39 sq mi). The urban area of Barcelona extends beyond the administrative city limits with a population of between 4,200,000[1] and 4,500,000[2] within an area of 803 km2 (310 sq mi),[1] being the sixth-most populous urban area in the European Union after Paris, London, the Ruhr, Madrid and Milan. About five million[3][4][5][6] people live in the Barcelona metropolitan area. It is also the largest metropolis on the Mediterranean Sea. It is located on the Mediterranean coast between the mouths of the rivers Llobregat and Besòs and is bounded to the west by the Serra de Collserola ridge (512 m/1,680 ft). Founded as a Roman city, Barcelona became the capital of the County of Barcelona. After merging with the Kingdom of Aragon, Barcelona became one of the most important cities of the Crown of Aragon. Besieged several times during its history, Barcelona has a rich cultural heritage and is today an important cultural centre and a major tourist destination. Particularly renowned are the architectural works of Antoni Gaudí and Lluís Domènech i Montaner, which have been designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites. The headquarters of the Union for the Mediterranean is located in Barcelona. The city is known for hosting the 1992 Summer Olympics as well as world-class conferences and expositions and also many international sport tournaments. Barcelona is today one of the world's leading tourist, economic, trade fair/exhibitions and cultural-sports centres, and its influence in commerce, education, entertainment, media, fashion, science, and the arts all contribute to its status as one of the world's major global cities.[7][8] Indeed, it is a major cultural and economic centre in southwestern Europe (Iberian Peninsula), 26th in the world (after Moscow, before Dubai)[9] and a growing financial centre (Diagonal Mar and Gran Via). It is the fourth economically powerful city by GDP in the European Union and 35th in the world with an output amounting to €177 billion.[10] As of 2009 the city was ranked Europe's third and one of the world's most successful as a city brand.[11] At the same time, the city was ranked Europe's fourth best city for business and fastest improving European city, with growth improved by 17% per year.[12] Barcelona is the transport hub with one of Europe's principal ports, Barcelona international airport, which handles above 34 million passengers per year, extensive motorway network and also is a hub of high-speed rail, particularly that which is intended to link Spain with France and the rest of Europe as the second longest in the world ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Barcelona

Barcelona is the capital of Catalonia and the second largest city in Spain, after Madrid, with a population of 1,621,537 within its administrative limits on a land area of 101.4 km2 (39 sq mi). The urban area of Barcelona extends beyond the administrative city limits with a population of between 4,200,000[1] and 4,500,000[2] within an area of 803 km2 (310 sq mi),[1] being the sixth-most populous urban area in the European Union after Paris, London, the Ruhr, Madrid and Milan. About five million[3][4][5][6] people live in the Barcelona metropolitan area. It is also the largest metropolis on the Mediterranean Sea. It is located on the Mediterranean coast between the mouths of the rivers Llobregat and Besòs and is bounded to the west by the Serra de Collserola ridge (512 m/1,680 ft). Founded as a Roman city, Barcelona became the capital of the County of Barcelona. After merging with the Kingdom of Aragon, Barcelona became one of the most important cities of the Crown of Aragon. Besieged several times during its history, Barcelona has a rich cultural heritage and is today an important cultural centre and a major tourist destination. Particularly renowned are the architectural works of Antoni Gaudí and Lluís Domènech i Montaner, which have been designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites. The headquarters of the Union for the Mediterranean is located in Barcelona. The city is known for hosting the 1992 Summer Olympics as well as world-class conferences and expositions and also many international sport tournaments. Barcelona is today one of the world's leading tourist, economic, trade fair/exhibitions and cultural-sports centres, and its influence in commerce, education, entertainment, media, fashion, science, and the arts all contribute to its status as one of the world's major global cities.[7][8] Indeed, it is a major cultural and economic centre in southwestern Europe (Iberian Peninsula), 26th in the world (after Moscow, before Dubai)[9] and a growing financial centre (Diagonal Mar and Gran Via). It is the fourth economically powerful city by GDP in the European Union and 35th in the world with an output amounting to €177 billion.[10] As of 2009 the city was ranked Europe's third and one of the world's most successful as a city brand.[11] At the same time, the city was ranked Europe's fourth best city for business and fastest improving European city, with growth improved by 17% per year.[12] Barcelona is the transport hub with one of Europe's principal ports, Barcelona international airport, which handles above 34 million passengers per year, extensive motorway network and also is a hub of high-speed rail, particularly that which is intended to link Spain with France and the rest of Europe as the second longest in the world ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

In the news Today

Barcelona is the capital of Catalonia and the second largest city in Spain, after Madrid, with a population of 1,621,537 within its administrative limits on a land area of 101.4 km2 (39 sq mi). The urban area of Barcelona extends beyond the administrative city limits with a population of between 4,200,000[1] and 4,500,000[2] within an area of 803 km2 (310 sq mi),[1] being the sixth-most populous urban area in the European Union after Paris, London, the Ruhr, Madrid and Milan. About five million[3][4][5][6] people live in the Barcelona metropolitan area. It is also the largest metropolis on the Mediterranean Sea. It is located on the Mediterranean coast between the mouths of the rivers Llobregat and Besòs and is bounded to the west by the Serra de Collserola ridge (512 m/1,680 ft). Founded as a Roman city, Barcelona became the capital of the County of Barcelona. After merging with the Kingdom of Aragon, Barcelona became one of the most important cities of the Crown of Aragon. Besieged several times during its history, Barcelona has a rich cultural heritage and is today an important cultural centre and a major tourist destination. Particularly renowned are the architectural works of Antoni Gaudí and Lluís Domènech i Montaner, which have been designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites. The headquarters of the Union for the Mediterranean is located in Barcelona. The city is known for hosting the 1992 Summer Olympics as well as world-class conferences and expositions and also many international sport tournaments. Barcelona is today one of the world's leading tourist, economic, trade fair/exhibitions and cultural-sports centres, and its influence in commerce, education, entertainment, media, fashion, science, and the arts all contribute to its status as one of the world's major global cities.[7][8] Indeed, it is a major cultural and economic centre in southwestern Europe (Iberian Peninsula), 26th in the world (after Moscow, before Dubai)[9] and a growing financial centre (Diagonal Mar and Gran Via). It is the fourth economically powerful city by GDP in the European Union and 35th in the world with an output amounting to €177 billion.[10] As of 2009 the city was ranked Europe's third and one of the world's most successful as a city brand.[11] At the same time, the city was ranked Europe's fourth best city for business and fastest improving European city, with growth improved by 17% per year.[12] Barcelona is the transport hub with one of Europe's principal ports, Barcelona international airport, which handles above 34 million passengers per year, extensive motorway network and also is a hub of high-speed rail, particularly that which is intended to link Spain with France and the rest of Europe as the second longest in the world ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Seasons change

Barcelona is the capital of Catalonia and the second largest city in Spain, after Madrid, with a population of 1,621,537 within its administrative limits on a land area of 101.4 km2 (39 sq mi). The urban area of Barcelona extends beyond the administrative city limits with a population of between 4,200,000[1] and 4,500,000[2] within an area of 803 km2 (310 sq mi),[1] being the sixth-most populous urban area in the European Union after Paris, London, the Ruhr, Madrid and Milan. About five million[3][4][5][6] people live in the Barcelona metropolitan area. It is also the largest metropolis on the Mediterranean Sea. It is located on the Mediterranean coast between the mouths of the rivers Llobregat and Besòs and is bounded to the west by the Serra de Collserola ridge (512 m/1,680 ft). Founded as a Roman city, Barcelona became the capital of the County of Barcelona. After merging with the Kingdom of Aragon, Barcelona became one of the most important cities of the Crown of Aragon. Besieged several times during its history, Barcelona has a rich cultural heritage and is today an important cultural centre and a major tourist destination. Particularly renowned are the architectural works of Antoni Gaudí and Lluís Domènech i Montaner, which have been designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites. The headquarters of the Union for the Mediterranean is located in Barcelona. The city is known for hosting the 1992 Summer Olympics as well as world-class conferences and expositions and also many international sport tournaments. Barcelona is today one of the world's leading tourist, economic, trade fair/exhibitions and cultural-sports centres, and its influence in commerce, education, entertainment, media, fashion, science, and the arts all contribute to its status as one of the world's major global cities.[7][8] Indeed, it is a major cultural and economic centre in southwestern Europe (Iberian Peninsula), 26th in the world (after Moscow, before Dubai)[9] and a growing financial centre (Diagonal Mar and Gran Via). It is the fourth economically powerful city by GDP in the European Union and 35th in the world with an output amounting to €177 billion.[10] As of 2009 the city was ranked Europe's third and one of the world's most successful as a city brand.[11] At the same time, the city was ranked Europe's fourth best city for business and fastest improving European city, with growth improved by 17% per year.[12] Barcelona is the transport hub with one of Europe's principal ports, Barcelona international airport, which handles above 34 million passengers per year, extensive motorway network and also is a hub of high-speed rail, particularly that which is intended to link Spain with France and the rest of Europe as the second longest in the world ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Chicken Out

The Mercat de Sant Josep de la Boqueria, often simply referred to as La Boqueria (Catalan pronunciation: [ɫə βu.kəˈɾi.ə]), is a large public market in the Ciutat Vella district of Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain and one of the city's foremost tourist landmarks, with an entrance from La Rambla, not far from the Liceu, Barcelona's opera house. The market has a very diverse selection of goods. The first mention of the Boqueria market in Barcelona dates from 1217, when tables were installed near the old city gate to sell meat. From December 1470 onwards, a pig market was held at this site; at this time it was known as Mercat Bornet. Later, until 1794, it was known simply as Mercat de la Palla, or straw market. In the beginning, the market was not enclosed and had no official status, being regarded simply as an extension of the Plaça Nova market, which extended to the Plaça del Pi. Later, the authorities decided to construct a separate market on La Rambla, housing mainly fishmongers and butchers. It was not until 1826 that the market was legally recognized, and a convention held in 1835 decided to build an official structure. Construction began on March 19, 1840 under the direction of the architect Mas Vilà. The market officially opened in the same year, but the plans for the building were modified many times. The inauguration of the structure finally took place in 1853. A new fish market opened in 1911, and the metal roof that still exists today was constructed in 1914. ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Waiting in Lisboa

Lisbon Portuguese: Lisboa, is the capital city and largest city of Portugal with a population of 547,631 within its administrative limits[2] on a land area of 84.8 km2 (33 sq mi). The urban area of Lisbon extends beyond the administrative city limits with a population of over 3 million[3] on an area of 958 km2 (370 sq mi),[3] making it the 9th most populous urban area in the European Union. About 2,831,000[4][5] people live in the Lisbon Metropolitan Area (which represents approximately 27% of the population of the country). Lisbon is the westernmost large city located in Europe, as well as its westernmost capital city and the only one along the Atlantic coast. It lies in the western Iberian Peninsula on the Atlantic Ocean and the Tagus River. Lisbon is recognised as a global city because of its importance in finance, commerce, media, entertainment, arts, international trade, education, and tourism.[6][7] It is one of the major economic centres on the continent, with a growing financial sector and the largest/second largest container port on Europe's Atlantic coast.[8] Lisbon Portela Airport serves about 13 million passengers per year; the motorway network and the high-speed rail system of (Alfa Pendular) link the main cities of Portugal.[9] Lisbon is the 23rd most livable city in the World according to lifestyle magazine Monocle.[10] The city is the seventh-most-visited city in Southern Europe, after Istanbul, Rome, Barcelona, Madrid, Athens, and Milan, with 1,740,000 tourists in 2009.[11] The Lisbon region is the wealthiest region in Portugal, GDP PPP per capita is 26,100 euros (4.7% higher than the average European Union's GDP PPP per capita). It is the tenth richest metropolitan area by GDP on the continent amounting to 110 billion euros and thus €39,375 per capita, [12] 40% higher than the average European Union's GDP per capita. The city occupies 32nd place of highest gross earnings in the world.[13] Most of the headquarters of multinationals in the country are located in the Lisbon area and it is the ninth city in the world in terms of quantity of international conferences.[14] It is also the political centre of the country, as seat of Government and residence of the Head of State. The seat of the district of Lisbon and the centre of the Lisbon region. Lisbon is one of the oldest cities in the world, and the oldest city in Western Europe, predating other modern European capitals such as London, Paris and Rome by hundreds of years. Julius Caesar made it a municipium called Felicitas Julia, adding to the name Olissipo. Ruled by a series of Germanic tribes from the fifth century, it was captured by the Moors in the eighth century. In 1147, the Crusaders under Afonso Henriques reconquered the city and since then it has been a major political, economic, and cultural centre of Portugal. Unlike most capital cities, Lisbon's status as the capital of Portugal has never been granted or confirmed officially – by statute or in written form. Its position as the capital has formed through constitutional convention, making its position as de facto capital a part of the Constitution of Portugal. Lisbon hosts two agencies of the European Union: the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA) and the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA). Called the "Capital of the Lusophone world", the Community of Portuguese Language Countries has its headquarters in the city, in the Palace of the Counts of Penafiel. Lisbon has two sites listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site: Belém Tower and Jerónimos Monastery. Furthermore, in 1994, Lisbon was the European Capital of Culture and in 1998 organised an Expo '98 (1998 Lisbon World Exposition). Lisbon enjoys a Mediterranean climate. Among all the metropolises in Europe, it has the warmest winters, with average temperatures 15 °C (59 °F) during the day and 8 °C (46 °F) at night from December to February. The typical summer's season lasts about six months, from May to October, although also in November, March and April temperatures sometimes reach around 20 °C (68.0 °F) ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Valley Of Cold

Heavy snow fall in the small town of Julian, San Diego, California, Saturday the 9th of February 2013. Julian is an historic gold mining town located approximately an hour east of San Diego. It is the premier mountain retreat in the county and is unique in that it has four seasons. Spring brings the blossoming of many flowers including daffodils, summer is perfect for hiking and star gazing, fall is famous for our apples and fall colors, and winter brings snowfalls and bright, crisp, "Christmassy" days. Although famous for apples and our superb apple pie one can enjoy all year round, Julian has become the center for visitors who wish to stay in the mountains but take day trips to the nearby casinos, the Anza Borrego Desert State Park and the coast. It has always been the B&B capital of Southern California, known for its romantic atmosphere, but is now fast becoming a great destination for families, hikers, weddings and corporate retreats. Specialty shops line our streets, our attractions are unique, ranging from wineries to wolves. From the old time melodrama to the Grape Stomp Fiesta, Julian events are great for couples, families and groups. The hallmark of Julian is apple pie. After the American Civil War, Julian experienced a gold rush. In 1869, A.E. "Fred" Coleman, a former slave, was crossing over what is now known as Coleman Creek, just west of Julian. Seeing a glint of gold in the stream bed, he climbed down from his horse to investigate. Having had previous experience in the gold fields, he retrieved his frying pan and began panning the sands of the creek. Learning of the find, others tried to trace the gold to its source. On February 22, 1870, the first "lode", or hard rock, mining claim was filed in the Julian area. ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Slow down

Heavy snow fall in the small town of Julian, San Diego, California, Saturday the 9th of February 2013. Julian is an historic gold mining town located approximately an hour east of San Diego. It is the premier mountain retreat in the county and is unique in that it has four seasons. Spring brings the blossoming of many flowers including daffodils, summer is perfect for hiking and star gazing, fall is famous for our apples and fall colors, and winter brings snowfalls and bright, crisp, "Christmassy" days. Although famous for apples and our superb apple pie one can enjoy all year round, Julian has become the center for visitors who wish to stay in the mountains but take day trips to the nearby casinos, the Anza Borrego Desert State Park and the coast. It has always been the B&B capital of Southern California, known for its romantic atmosphere, but is now fast becoming a great destination for families, hikers, weddings and corporate retreats. Specialty shops line our streets, our attractions are unique, ranging from wineries to wolves. From the old time melodrama to the Grape Stomp Fiesta, Julian events are great for couples, families and groups. The hallmark of Julian is apple pie. After the American Civil War, Julian experienced a gold rush. In 1869, A.E. "Fred" Coleman, a former slave, was crossing over what is now known as Coleman Creek, just west of Julian. Seeing a glint of gold in the stream bed, he climbed down from his horse to investigate. Having had previous experience in the gold fields, he retrieved his frying pan and began panning the sands of the creek. Learning of the find, others tried to trace the gold to its source. On February 22, 1870, the first "lode", or hard rock, mining claim was filed in the Julian area. ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Tintype Truck

Heavy snow fall in the small town of Julian, San Diego, California, Saturday the 9th of February 2013. Julian is an historic gold mining town located approximately an hour east of San Diego. It is the premier mountain retreat in the county and is unique in that it has four seasons. Spring brings the blossoming of many flowers including daffodils, summer is perfect for hiking and star gazing, fall is famous for our apples and fall colors, and winter brings snowfalls and bright, crisp, "Christmassy" days. Although famous for apples and our superb apple pie one can enjoy all year round, Julian has become the center for visitors who wish to stay in the mountains but take day trips to the nearby casinos, the Anza Borrego Desert State Park and the coast. It has always been the B&B capital of Southern California, known for its romantic atmosphere, but is now fast becoming a great destination for families, hikers, weddings and corporate retreats. Specialty shops line our streets, our attractions are unique, ranging from wineries to wolves. From the old time melodrama to the Grape Stomp Fiesta, Julian events are great for couples, families and groups. The hallmark of Julian is apple pie. After the American Civil War, Julian experienced a gold rush. In 1869, A.E. "Fred" Coleman, a former slave, was crossing over what is now known as Coleman Creek, just west of Julian. Seeing a glint of gold in the stream bed, he climbed down from his horse to investigate. Having had previous experience in the gold fields, he retrieved his frying pan and began panning the sands of the creek. Learning of the find, others tried to trace the gold to its source. On February 22, 1870, the first "lode", or hard rock, mining claim was filed in the Julian area. ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Un Wanted

Pullman abandoned Train Yard in Kirkwood, Atlanta late February. The Pratt Engineering/Pullman Company property is an historic transportation and industrial complex, dating back to the country's industrialisation in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The Pratt Engineering Company purchased this property adjacent to the rail line in 1900 in what was once the City of Kirkwood. The Pratt company did defense contracting work during World War I and in the 1920s the entire facility was purchased by the Pullman Passenger Rail Car Company and converted to use for everything from regular car maintenance to entire rebuilds and refitting of large locomotives. This facility served the entire southeast and until The Pullman Company lost an anti-trust case in the late 1940s, Pullman Inc. by federal court order, sold on June 30th The Pullman Co., the sleeping car division, to 59 railroads. The capitol stock of the company was now owned by these railroads. There was no further connection or affiliation with Pullman Incorporated or the Pullman-Standard Manufacturing Co. Sale price to the railroads was $40 million. Many of the industrial buildings, characterized by brick clad and riveted iron skeleton construction built by Pratt Engineering and the brick clad reinforced concrete buildings built by the Pullman Company remain on the site. Soon after the anti-trust loss, Pullman drastically scaled back operations and in 1950 sold the Atlanta yard to Georgia Power where it was used to service trackless trolleys for their mass transit operations. In 1990 the Georgia Building Authority bought the property and for a time in the mid 1990s, the state ran a supper train ride out to Stone Mountain called the New Georgia Railroad whose passenger terminal was located near the GSU campus in a small building now used by Atlanta Police Department which just happens to hold the original Atlantic & Western zero mile marker which founded Atlanta. Since the demise of the NGR the property had sat idle for some time before re-selling 1.85 acres to Georgia Power to build a power sub-station that would service the surrounding communities. They project is currently in production, they have torn down 2 buildings but will not be allowed to tear down anymore. Some of the buildings are on the Atlanta Preservation Society watch list of endangered historic structures. ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Cold Steel

Pullman abandoned Train Yard in Kirkwood, Atlanta late February. The Pratt Engineering/Pullman Company property is an historic transportation and industrial complex, dating back to the country's industrialisation in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The Pratt Engineering Company purchased this property adjacent to the rail line in 1900 in what was once the City of Kirkwood. The Pratt company did defense contracting work during World War I and in the 1920s the entire facility was purchased by the Pullman Passenger Rail Car Company and converted to use for everything from regular car maintenance to entire rebuilds and refitting of large locomotives. This facility served the entire southeast and until The Pullman Company lost an anti-trust case in the late 1940s, Pullman Inc. by federal court order, sold on June 30th The Pullman Co., the sleeping car division, to 59 railroads. The capitol stock of the company was now owned by these railroads. There was no further connection or affiliation with Pullman Incorporated or the Pullman-Standard Manufacturing Co. Sale price to the railroads was $40 million. Many of the industrial buildings, characterized by brick clad and riveted iron skeleton construction built by Pratt Engineering and the brick clad reinforced concrete buildings built by the Pullman Company remain on the site. Soon after the anti-trust loss, Pullman drastically scaled back operations and in 1950 sold the Atlanta yard to Georgia Power where it was used to service trackless trolleys for their mass transit operations. In 1990 the Georgia Building Authority bought the property and for a time in the mid 1990s, the state ran a supper train ride out to Stone Mountain called the New Georgia Railroad whose passenger terminal was located near the GSU campus in a small building now used by Atlanta Police Department which just happens to hold the original Atlantic & Western zero mile marker which founded Atlanta. Since the demise of the NGR the property had sat idle for some time before re-selling 1.85 acres to Georgia Power to build a power sub-station that would service the surrounding communities. They project is currently in production, they have torn down 2 buildings but will not be allowed to tear down anymore. Some of the buildings are on the Atlanta Preservation Society watch list of endangered historic structures. ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Urban Art

Pullman abandoned Train Yard in Kirkwood, Atlanta late February. The Pratt Engineering/Pullman Company property is an historic transportation and industrial complex, dating back to the country's industrialisation in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The Pratt Engineering Company purchased this property adjacent to the rail line in 1900 in what was once the City of Kirkwood. The Pratt company did defense contracting work during World War I and in the 1920s the entire facility was purchased by the Pullman Passenger Rail Car Company and converted to use for everything from regular car maintenance to entire rebuilds and refitting of large locomotives. This facility served the entire southeast and until The Pullman Company lost an anti-trust case in the late 1940s, Pullman Inc. by federal court order, sold on June 30th The Pullman Co., the sleeping car division, to 59 railroads. The capitol stock of the company was now owned by these railroads. There was no further connection or affiliation with Pullman Incorporated or the Pullman-Standard Manufacturing Co. Sale price to the railroads was $40 million. Many of the industrial buildings, characterized by brick clad and riveted iron skeleton construction built by Pratt Engineering and the brick clad reinforced concrete buildings built by the Pullman Company remain on the site. Soon after the anti-trust loss, Pullman drastically scaled back operations and in 1950 sold the Atlanta yard to Georgia Power where it was used to service trackless trolleys for their mass transit operations. In 1990 the Georgia Building Authority bought the property and for a time in the mid 1990s, the state ran a supper train ride out to Stone Mountain called the New Georgia Railroad whose passenger terminal was located near the GSU campus in a small building now used by Atlanta Police Department which just happens to hold the original Atlantic & Western zero mile marker which founded Atlanta. Since the demise of the NGR the property had sat idle for some time before re-selling 1.85 acres to Georgia Power to build a power sub-station that would service the surrounding communities. They project is currently in production, they have torn down 2 buildings but will not be allowed to tear down anymore. Some of the buildings are on the Atlanta Preservation Society watch list of endangered historic structures. ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Gold, Lots of Gold

Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque was initiated by the late President of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), HH Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan. His final resting place is located on the grounds beside the same mosque. It is the largest mosque in the United Arab Emirates and the eighth largest mosque in the world. The mosque site is equivalent to the size five football fields approximately. The United Arab Emirates, sometimes simply called the Emirates or the UAE, is a country situated in the southeast of the Arabian Peninsula in Western Asia on the Persian Gulf, bordering Oman to the east and Saudi Arabia to the south, as well as sharing sea borders with Qatar to the west and Iran to the north. (Photo Credit Must Read: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Fire Hydrant

Pullman abandoned Train Yard in Kirkwood, Atlanta late February. The Pratt Engineering/Pullman Company property is an historic transportation and industrial complex, dating back to the country's industrialisation in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The Pratt Engineering Company purchased this property adjacent to the rail line in 1900 in what was once the City of Kirkwood. The Pratt company did defense contracting work during World War I and in the 1920s the entire facility was purchased by the Pullman Passenger Rail Car Company and converted to use for everything from regular car maintenance to entire rebuilds and refitting of large locomotives. This facility served the entire southeast and until The Pullman Company lost an anti-trust case in the late 1940s, Pullman Inc. by federal court order, sold on June 30th The Pullman Co., the sleeping car division, to 59 railroads. The capitol stock of the company was now owned by these railroads. There was no further connection or affiliation with Pullman Incorporated or the Pullman-Standard Manufacturing Co. Sale price to the railroads was $40 million. Many of the industrial buildings, characterized by brick clad and riveted iron skeleton construction built by Pratt Engineering and the brick clad reinforced concrete buildings built by the Pullman Company remain on the site. Soon after the anti-trust loss, Pullman drastically scaled back operations and in 1950 sold the Atlanta yard to Georgia Power where it was used to service trackless trolleys for their mass transit operations. In 1990 the Georgia Building Authority bought the property and for a time in the mid 1990s, the state ran a supper train ride out to Stone Mountain called the New Georgia Railroad whose passenger terminal was located near the GSU campus in a small building now used by Atlanta Police Department which just happens to hold the original Atlantic & Western zero mile marker which founded Atlanta. Since the demise of the NGR the property had sat id

Bull Fight

Campo Pequeno - Bullfight Arena. The Portuguese bullfight is a truly unique experience. It begins with a bullfighter on horseback, attempting to insert metal barbed swords in the front haunches of the bull. Then the tourada benefits from the daring tradition of the forcados. The forcados are a group of eight brave (/crazy) young men whose job it is to irritate and tire the bull, which they do by rushing him all at once, dressed in bright red and green hats and coats. This tradition was supposedly invented when the guards of royal box seats, who used pitchforks (forcados) to prevent the bull from entering the box, were called on to grab the bull. This action, designed to make the fight less bloody, was and is still called the pega, or the grabbing of the bull. For the past couple of years, the Campo Pequeno arena had been closed for renovation. With its reopening in 2006 as an arena with sub-terranean shopping center, Campo Pequeno buzzes once again. ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

River Boats

The River Hamble is a river in Hampshire, England. It rises near Bishop's Waltham and flows for some 7.5 miles (12 km) through Botley, Bursledon and Swanwick before entering Southampton Water near Hamble-le-Rice and Warsash. The Hamble is tidal for approximately half its length and is navigable in its lower reaches, which have facilitated shipbuilding activities since medieval times. Leisure craft are still built there today. One of these builders was Luke & co, later Luke Bros, a reputed yard at Hamble from around 1890 to 1945. The river, and its shipbuilding yards, have also been used for military purposes, particularly during World War II. Its lower reaches are now very popular for boating, being known throughout the sailing world as The Heart of British Yachting ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Moored Boats

The River Hamble is a river in Hampshire, England. It rises near Bishop's Waltham and flows for some 7.5 miles (12 km) through Botley, Bursledon and Swanwick before entering Southampton Water near Hamble-le-Rice and Warsash. The Hamble is tidal for approximately half its length and is navigable in its lower reaches, which have facilitated shipbuilding activities since medieval times. Leisure craft are still built there today. One of these builders was Luke & co, later Luke Bros, a reputed yard at Hamble from around 1890 to 1945. The river, and its shipbuilding yards, have also been used for military purposes, particularly during World War II. Its lower reaches are now very popular for boating, being known throughout the sailing world as The Heart of British Yachting ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Working man on the river

The River Hamble is a river in Hampshire, England. It rises near Bishop's Waltham and flows for some 7.5 miles (12 km) through Botley, Bursledon and Swanwick before entering Southampton Water near Hamble-le-Rice and Warsash. The Hamble is tidal for approximately half its length and is navigable in its lower reaches, which have facilitated shipbuilding activities since medieval times. Leisure craft are still built there today. One of these builders was Luke & co, later Luke Bros, a reputed yard at Hamble from around 1890 to 1945. The river, and its shipbuilding yards, have also been used for military purposes, particularly during World War II. Its lower reaches are now very popular for boating, being known throughout the sailing world as The Heart of British Yachting ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Wrecked On On The River Hamble

The River Hamble is a river in Hampshire, England. It rises near Bishop's Waltham and flows for some 7.5 miles (12 km) through Botley, Bursledon and Swanwick before entering Southampton Water near Hamble-le-Rice and Warsash. The Hamble is tidal for approximately half its length and is navigable in its lower reaches, which have facilitated shipbuilding activities since medieval times. Leisure craft are still built there today. One of these builders was Luke & co, later Luke Bros, a reputed yard at Hamble from around 1890 to 1945. The river, and its shipbuilding yards, have also been used for military purposes, particularly during World War II. Its lower reaches are now very popular for boating, being known throughout the sailing world as The Heart of British Yachting ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

Gator Wait

An Aligator waits beside the road in the Everglades national Park, Florida on a hot summers day. (Photo Credit: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM)

The African Queen

The real boat used in film "The African Queen" is a 1951 adventure film adapted from the 1935 novel of the same name by C. S. Forester. (Photo Credit: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES)

Cape Baboons

Coastlines of the world and one of the most famous the Cape of Good Hope. There is a misconception that the Cape of Good Hope is the southern tip of Africa, because it was once believed to be the dividing point between the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. In fact, the southernmost point is Cape Agulhas, about 150 kilometres (90 mi) to the east-southeast. The currents of the two oceans meet at the point where the warm-water Agulhas current meets the cold water Benguela current and turns back on itself—a point that fluctuates between Cape Agulhas and Cape Point (about 1.2 kilometres east of the Cape of Good Hope). When following the western side of the African coastline from the equator, however, the Cape of Good Hope marks the point where a ship begins to travel more eastward than southward. Thus, the first modern rounding of the cape in 1488 by Portuguese explorer Bartolomeu Dias was a milestone in the attempts by the Portuguese to establish direct trade relations with the Far East (although in his histories Herodotus proves, disbelievingly, that some Phoenicians had done so far earlier than this[1]). Dias(or Diaz) called the cape Cabo das Tormentas. "Cape of Storms" was the original name of the "Cape of Good Hope".[2] As one of the great capes of the South Atlantic Ocean, the Cape of Good Hope has been of special significance to sailors for many years and is widely referred to by them simply as "the Cape."[3] It is a waypoint on the clipper route followed by clipper ships to the Far East and Australia, and still followed by several offshore yacht races. (Photo Credit Must Read: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Flocking Pink

The United Arab Emirates, sometimes simply called the Emirates or the UAE, is a country situated in the southeast of the Arabian Peninsula in Western Asia on the Persian Gulf, bordering Oman to the east and Saudi Arabia to the south, as well as sharing sea borders with Qatar to the west and Iran to the north. (Photo Credit Must Read: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Little people

Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque was initiated by the late President of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), HH Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan. His final resting place is located on the grounds beside the same mosque. It is the largest mosque in the United Arab Emirates and the eighth largest mosque in the world. The mosque site is equivalent to the size five football fields approximately. The United Arab Emirates, sometimes simply called the Emirates or the UAE, is a country situated in the southeast of the Arabian Peninsula in Western Asia on the Persian Gulf, bordering Oman to the east and Saudi Arabia to the south, as well as sharing sea borders with Qatar to the west and Iran to the north. (Photo Credit Must Read: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Cape Wild Life

Coastlines of the world and one of the most famous the Cape of Good Hope. There is a misconception that the Cape of Good Hope is the southern tip of Africa, because it was once believed to be the dividing point between the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. In fact, the southernmost point is Cape Agulhas, about 150 kilometres (90 mi) to the east-southeast. The currents of the two oceans meet at the point where the warm-water Agulhas current meets the cold water Benguela current and turns back on itself—a point that fluctuates between Cape Agulhas and Cape Point (about 1.2 kilometres east of the Cape of Good Hope). When following the western side of the African coastline from the equator, however, the Cape of Good Hope marks the point where a ship begins to travel more eastward than southward. Thus, the first modern rounding of the cape in 1488 by Portuguese explorer Bartolomeu Dias was a milestone in the attempts by the Portuguese to establish direct trade relations with the Far East (although in his histories Herodotus proves, disbelievingly, that some Phoenicians had done so far earlier than this[1]). Dias(or Diaz) called the cape Cabo das Tormentas. "Cape of Storms" was the original name of the "Cape of Good Hope".[2] As one of the great capes of the South Atlantic Ocean, the Cape of Good Hope has been of special significance to sailors for many years and is widely referred to by them simply as "the Cape."[3] It is a waypoint on the clipper route followed by clipper ships to the Far East and Australia, and still followed by several offshore yacht races. (Photo Credit Must Read: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

Sea Ostrich

Coastlines of the world and one of the most famous the Cape of Good Hope. There is a misconception that the Cape of Good Hope is the southern tip of Africa, because it was once believed to be the dividing point between the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. In fact, the southernmost point is Cape Agulhas, about 150 kilometres (90 mi) to the east-southeast. The currents of the two oceans meet at the point where the warm-water Agulhas current meets the cold water Benguela current and turns back on itself—a point that fluctuates between Cape Agulhas and Cape Point (about 1.2 kilometres east of the Cape of Good Hope). When following the western side of the African coastline from the equator, however, the Cape of Good Hope marks the point where a ship begins to travel more eastward than southward. Thus, the first modern rounding of the cape in 1488 by Portuguese explorer Bartolomeu Dias was a milestone in the attempts by the Portuguese to establish direct trade relations with the Far East (although in his histories Herodotus proves, disbelievingly, that some Phoenicians had done so far earlier than this[1]). Dias(or Diaz) called the cape Cabo das Tormentas. "Cape of Storms" was the original name of the "Cape of Good Hope".[2] As one of the great capes of the South Atlantic Ocean, the Cape of Good Hope has been of special significance to sailors for many years and is widely referred to by them simply as "the Cape."[3] It is a waypoint on the clipper route followed by clipper ships to the Far East and Australia, and still followed by several offshore yacht races. (Photo Credit Must Read: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

My office View

El Campello is a small sleepy fishing village just North of Alicante on the Costa Blanca coast in Spain. It has clear blue water and great cafe's to sit in the sun and relax. Photo Credit must read © WWW.OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM or a 50 Euro fee is charged

Night Flight in Lisbon

Flying around Lisbon at 2am on a night shoot over the city using my new Nikon D800 at high ISO. Photo Credit: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM)

Thunder in the Everglades

We were doing a shoot this sumer in Florida over the Everglades in this little Huges 500 and this massive thunder storm came out of know where and we had to look for a place to sit down where there was no water or Gators. Photo Credit: PAUL TODD/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM)